A SURVEYOR’S PERSPECTIVE ON TUNNELLING MACHINES

2012 UNDERGRADUATE THESIS

By:                                          MATTHEW BEHLING (3282418)

Supervisor:                                                  DR BRUCE HARVEY

Co-Supervisor:  MR STEVEN GARLINGE (LYNTON SURVEYS)

 

 

 

HOME

BACKGROUND

CALIBRATION

CALIBRATION CASE STUDIES:

v  METROP.

v  VAPS

v  CECT

CALIBRATION IN-DEPTH ANALYSIS

v  VOLTAGE TO ANGLE TRENDLINE

v  SLEW AND RAISE MOVEMENT

v  LEAST SQUARES 2D CIRCLE FITTING

v  LEAST SQUARES 3D CIRCLE FITTING

FURTHER WORK

CONCLUSIONS

REFERENCES

CONTACT DETAILS

 

Welcome........

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For thousands of years tunnels have played a crucial role in expanding civilisation. Romans were skilled tunnel builders, who made several kilometres of long underground passages using human slaves. Today machines such as roadheaders replace these slaves to achieve tunnels longer and deeper than ever imagined.

This thesis looks at how an automated guidance system can be implemented to a roadheader and focuses heavily on the calibration procedure which surveyors contribute to as positioning specialists.

A case study was used to practice the calibration processing procedure and this proved successful whilst highlighting the areas for further investigation. Two real-life roadheader calibrations were then completed with conformance reports confirming that these were successful procedures with only minor offsets having to be added.

The in-depth analysis section of this thesis confirmed that the most appropriate mathematical function for mapping the boom’s angular movement by voltages was a 3rd order polynomial. It was also found that when all points measured during raise and slew movements of the boom these were not strictly co-planar in the horizontal axis and vertical axis.

Using 2D Least Squares Circle Fitting proved successful in fitting circles to the slew and raise movement however unsuccessful in finding a better solution in the determination of movement centre points (HZC and VTC). Further work designing a method for 3D Least Squares Circle Fitting proved unsuccessful as the arc of data from the boom’s movement represented less than a quarter of a circle.

Overall it was found that considering the tolerance of tunnelling today is approximately ± 20mm using the current calibration method and slew and raise movement determination is sufficient.