Abstract


Abstract

Laser scanning is fast becoming an integral surveying tool for capturing massive amounts of information on a given surface in a short amount of time. An example of its increasing popularity is its use within the RTA, who is becoming increasingly reliant upon this technology when checking road surfaces. Surveyors on large construction sites also find it useful in checking the uniformity of concrete pads after being laid. But there are a number of key issues that surveyors must consider when using a laser scanner, such as accuracy, sources of error, best survey practices and presentation of the data to the client.

The main objective of this thesis was to research into how reliant a surveyor can be upon using a laser scanner for large-scale data capture. This was determined through a number of rigorous testing methods, designed to uncover insights into a number of keys areas. Such areas include possible sources of error, accuracy of acquired data, plane surface fitting and best practices to maximise the integrity of the results. The scanner that was used for this thesis was a Leica ScanStation 2 (the latest in this field at the time of writing), with Leica Cyclone 5.8 software.

 


 

Home   -   Abstract  -   Aim   -   Calibration   -   Testing   -   Conclusion  -   References