Fig 1.  The Leica 1200+ (Leica, 2005)

ROBOTIC TOTAL STATIONS

 

Robotic Total Stations incorporate the very latest in survey technology and are altering the way surveyors conduct their daily work. While many surveyors are currently experiencing the benefits of using a robotic instrument, there are also surveyors working in the industry that are unaware of the capabilities of a Robotic Total Station.

 

The aim of this project was to investigate two common Robotic Total Stations, the Leica 1200 and the Trimble S6. In this investigation, the features of each Robotic Total Station were analysed and their limitations were discovered. In particular, the ability to automatically turn onto the centre of a target (Automatic Target Recognition/Autolock) was researched and tested in order to learn about how this feature works and its accuracy and whether the Leica 1200 and Trimble S6 achieve their manufacturers’ quoted specifications.

 

This project aimed to not only test these instruments, but to explore a number of different applications where Robotic Total Stations can be used. The purpose of this is to advertise the role that a Robotic Total Station can have on the surveying industry and to promote survey technology. Once different surveying applications had been investigated, a series of simple instructions have been produced that can be used to conduct different survey tasks.

Fig 2, The Trimble S6 (Trimble, 2007)

Degree:

Bachelor of Engineering

(Surveying and Spatial Information Systems)

 

Course:

GMAT4001: Thesis

 

Author:

JOEL WOOBY

 

Supervisor:

Dr. BRUCE HARVEY

 

Year:

2008

School of Surveying and Spatial Information Systems, Faculty of Engineering, UNSW, SYDNEY, NSW 2052. Design by J. Wooby