To Predict Droughts, Don’t Look at the Skies. Look in the Soil… from Space

Another summer, another drought. Sydney’s water storages are running on empty, and desalinisation plants are being dusted off. Elsewhere, shrunken rivers, lakes and dams are swollen with rotting fish. Governments, irrigators and environmentalists blame each other for the drought, or just blame it on nature.

Ultimately, what matters are the impacts of drought: the damage to crops, pastures and environment; the uncontrollable fires that can take hold in dried-up forests and grasslands; the lack of water in dams and rivers that stops them from functioning. Each of these impacts is affected by more than just the amount of rain over an arbitrary number of months, and that makes defining drought difficult.

Scientists and governments alike have been looking for ways to measure drought in a way that relates more closely to its impacts. Any farmer or gardener can tell you that you don’t need much rain, but you do need it at the right time. This is where the soil becomes really important, because it is where plants get their water.

As it turns out, you need to move further away to get closer to this problem – into space, to be precise. In our new research, published in Nature Communications, we show just how much satellite instruments can tell us about drought. 

The satellite instruments have prosaic names such as SMOS and GRACE, but the way they measure water is mind-boggling. For example, the SMOS satellite unfurled a huge radio antenna in space to measure very specific radio waves emitted by the ground, and from it scientists can determine how much moisture is available in the topsoil. 

Even more amazingly, GRACE (now replaced by GRACE Follow-On) was a pair of laser-guided satellites in a continuous high-speed chase around the Earth. By measuring the distance between each other with barely imaginable accuracy, they could measure miniscule changes in the Earth’s gravitational field caused by local increases or decreases in the amount of water below the surface.

Read more in article… 

https://theconversation.com/to-predict-droughts-dont-look-at-the-skies-look-in-the-soil-from-space-110493?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Latest%20from%20The%20Conversation%20for%20January%2029%202019%20-%201222411238&utm_content=Latest%20from%20The%20Conversation%20for%20January%2029%202019%20-%201222411238+CID_685f801c17453211073f3c839280c514&utm_source=campaign_monitor&utm_term=To%20predict%20droughts%20dont%20look%20at%20the%20skies%20Look%20in%20the%20soil%20from%20space

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